How to Zombie-Proof Your Property

In honor of AMC’s The Walking Dead returning to television in a few short weeks, I would like to address an aspect of property safety we’ve yet to mention on this blog: a zombie apocalypse. Although there is some debate between whether this type of disaster is even possible, I would nonetheless like to offer up some tips to “zombie-proof” your property, which will come in hand for a variety of dangerous circumstances:

1) Educate your tenants and residents: Your clients should learn where the nearest fire exit, extinguisher, and first aid kits are around the complex. Additionally, they should know where they can obtain help in a dire situation. For example, where is the nearest hospital or CDC? What is the phone number to Poison Control or the local fire department? You may want to include a reference sheet that includes emergency protocol and contact information with every lease – that way everyone is on the same page from day one.

2) Embrace the art of the barricade: In the event of a zombie invasion, the windows and doors are all vulnerable to an attack. As a property manager, ask your maintenance team to check that the locks on your doors and windows are in working condition on a monthly basis. Additionally, you can purchase a quality deadbolt for each unit to make it harder for someone (or a hoard of the undead) to break down the door. Because windows can be fragile, tenants and residents can pile heavy furniture in front of the glass (make sure to wedge everything together, as if you were playing Tetris). As a bonus, the window barricade will obscure the movement of those within.

zombie-resized-6003) Keep extra food and water on hand: This tip is also useful if your area happes to experience a week-long power outage or a leak in the main water line. Accruing a stock pile of non-perishable canned goods or foods with a long shelf life as well as several gallons of water will ensure you don’t starve during a natural disaster. Zombies may not need to stay hydrated to survive, but humans certainly do!

4) Replenish the first aid kit: The Red Cross recommends some crucial contents of the kit, including aspirin, tweezers, gauze, a thermometer, and antibiotic ointment, among other things. In the event that someone gets bit, unfortunately it’s just a matter of time.

5) Run a generator: If at all possible, have a backup generator waiting in the wings to take over during a power outage. Make sure it has the capability to keep stairwells, bathrooms, or other windowless areas lit in the event of an emergency. That way, everyone o the property has a clear view of their surroundings if they happen to leave their part of the office or apartment in lieu of a new location.

6) Shhhhh!: Noise attracts the hoard, so keep your voice low and avoid the use of blenders (sorry, no smoothies in your Magic Bullet for a while), surround sound systems, vacuums, and other loud appliances. If you happen to venture outside, watch how close you get to parked cars – a car alarm will give away your exact position.

7) Go for the head: In case you weren’t aware, zombies are a little harder than your typical intruder to dispose of. If you don’t destroy the brain, they just keep coming (remember the bike girl in Walking Dead?). Don’t bother attacking the torso or limbs, just aim for the brain.

Can you think of additional zombie apocalypse survival tips? Share them with us in the comments section!

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